C-Section Blog Series (4 of 4)

The third part of our C-section blog series focused on the circumstances leading up to Calcutta Kids’ decision to stop partnering with private clinics for facility based deliveries, and instead (a) offer a Delivery Savings Scheme (DSS) which would provide financial assistance for beneficiaries to deliver wherever they prefer; and (b) up the ante on birth preparedness through a new home counseling curriculum. This week’s blog describes that curriculum, provides data on beneficiaries’ usage rates of the delivery savings scheme, and calls attention to the fact that more community involvement is necessary for the delivery savings program to succeed.

Throughout the pregnancies of our beneficiaries, our CHWs visit their homes at least once a month. During the last few months of pregnancy, the visits have become more standardized and focus on the following themes:

  • Danger signs. What to watch out for—especially pain in the lower abdomen, heavy white discharge or bloody discharge. In such cases, pregnant women are advised to go immediately to the facility with which they are registered, and to call their Area in Charge for support
  • What not to worry about: Many women become worried if the gestational age of their child crosses 37 weeks. The CHW’s counsel the women not to worry about this until around 40 weeks at which time they should visit their facility.
  • Preparation: The family is counseled to assure the availability of transportation to the facility regardless of the time of day or night, and to ensure that money is set aside for transport. They are also told what documentation to have ready to take with them to the facility.
  • To C or not to C: Pregnant women and their families are provided with knowledge about C-sections. They are informed of the recognized and accepted indications for C-sections; the potential risks for the mother after a C-section delivery; the potential risks for the mother during her next pregnancy; the immediate risks for the baby during a C-section delivery; and the potential long term risks for a C-section-delivered child.

The CK staff has gone through an intensive training focusing on these themes. (You can see these materials in the resources section of our website or you can click here for the Labor and Delivery Educational Session and here for the C-Section Education Session.)  They also have received refresher training on the labor and delivery process, fetal development, and complications that can occur during labor. And they are equipped with flip charts and other materials to facilitate their home-based counseling with pregnant women.

Delivery Savings Scheme Data:

  • Scheme began in July 2011
  • Since inception, 68 CK pregnant women out of 162 pregnant women in households registered with CK, have enrolled in DSS
  • Of those 68, 45 remain pregnant
    • Of the 45 who delivered, 2 had miscarriages; 29 had normal deliveries, and 14 had c-sections.
    • Of the 45 who delivered, 24 took place in private facilities and 19 took place in public facilities.
  • Currently (July 2012) there are 55 pregnant women involved with Calcutta Kids and 21 are participating in the DSS.

With a DSS user rate of around 40%, the scheme is not working as well as we would like. And the DSS is not working as a replacement for the services being provided earlier through private facilities.

Next week, Calcutta Kids will be holding a number of focus group discussions to try and figure out why it is that more pregnant women are not taking advantage of this scheme. The discussions will be held separately with those who have used the DSS and those who have not. We look forward to sharing what we learn from these discussions in a future blog.

From this data, however, some questions arise: Does this experience coupled with the micro insurance experience indicate that families (a) don’t have surplus cash on hand or (b) aren’t willing to use surplus cash for such a purpose or (c) that the men in the family are not willing to set such money aside for this or (d) there a is basic fear (based on the reality that there is a lot of huckstering that goes on in the slum) that they might never see their money again?

Clearly we have more work to do in facilitating a good option for safe facility-based delivery among our beneficiaries. We are confident that we will be able to find a solution which benefits our beneficiaries while at the same time protecting them—and also Calcutta Kids. -Sumana Ghosh, Danya Sarkar and Noah Levinson

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