Tag Archives: AIF Partnership

New BCC Techniques Introduced

At Calcutta Kids, community meetings are held to divulge health messages through meetings focused on various health topics. The community meetings also serve to promote interaction among the mothers of the community. Through the monthly meetings, Calcutta Kids promotes positive health-seeking behavior through the method of Behavior Change Communication (BCC). Women from the community have expressed the need for such a platform where they can share ideas, discuss challenges they face or simply sit along with other women from their community as they drink chai and listen to the health workers about life-saving practices they may adopt.

The health workers do a great job of getting the health messages across to the mothers, usually through an interactive lecture. They encourage mothers to ask questions, share personal experiences and initiate discussions. However, there seems to be a gap between the information that is conveyed during these meetings and the change in practices of the women. After a meeting, the women are able to repeat verbatim, some of the messages of “You must wash your hands before cooking” or “You must eat 6 times a day when pregnant.” Are they really adopting these practices in their homes though? In some of my visits to the community I found that this is not the case in all households.

For example, during my community visit with a health worker on the day of a religious festival, I observed 6 pregnant women who were fasting all day for the good health of their husbands in the future. In some of these cases pregnant women were fasting despite discouragement to do so from their husbands and mothers-in-law (both powerful family members who influence the actions of the mothers). These were mothers who had been to the community meetings and knew well the information about the importance of good nutrition for themselves and their children but continued this detrimental practice. Cultural and religious factors, domestic burden of having to work at home all day, and the simplicity of not having to take that extra step to eat one more meal or wash your hands one extra time often becomes the cause of poor health.

In order to initiate transformative change in the mothers of the community, it is necessary to create reflective processes in a safe space for women to explore their feelings. Providing them with health messages is necessary to build awareness, but in addition to this the health workers need to use approaches that encourage women to think about their behaviors. “Experts who study behavior change agree that long-lasting change is most likely when it is self-motivated and rooted in positive thinking.”(1) Additionally, the setting of a community meeting helps to “recognize the social nature, because it is the co-presence of others thinking alongside us that matters as much as the thinking itself, helping us change our attitudes and reflect on our values, while also acting as commitment devices.”(2)

In order to address this challenge and use different strategies to inculcate positive health behaviors, we are having an offsite training this week where we will introduce various counseling techniques to the health workers. A review of Child Health topics such as “Care of a Sick Child”, “Care of a Low birth Weight Baby, Child Growth and Development”, “Post natal care and Breastfeeding”, and “Feeding practices and Immunizations” will be carried out through the use of various activities to communicate the health messages. Two new topics will also be introduced 1) Family Planning and 2) Hygiene and Sanitation. These health topics will be reviewed using puppet shows, discussion groups, role-play, interactive games and ‘Forum Theater  to demonstrate the use of multiple techniques that can aid in communicating behavior change.

Forum theater  created by the Brazilian director Augusto Boal, serves as an interactive form of theater where dramatic sketches are created through discussion to show scenes where we see a problem that needs to be changed. When the play is acted out, members of the audience are allowed to step in and portray their solution in the given situation thus evolving from mere spectators into “spect-actors”. “The aim is not to find the best solution but to produce a variety of options that could be used in this type of situation.”(3) Forum theater functions by allowing the audience as well as the actors to experience real-life situations in a stage setting with the opportunity to offer multiple solutions to a problem they face. We aspire to introduce the concept of Forum theater to the staff of Calcutta Kids to build community and dialogue on the various problem situations that create obstacles for behavior change in the community. Through this training we hope to ignite the creative minds, especially our community health workers who can use such activities at the community meetings to aid in their counseling techniques.

The training begins at our MoSSK on Thursday 7th February and will continue at an outside training center where we will spend the weekend together.  There will be briefing about the various protocols, lecture sessions, leadership training activities and group work. Word on the street is that there is also an eco-friendly newspaper fashion show to encourage staff bonding and a little bit of fun! -Sriya Srikrishnan

References:

(1) Harvard Women’s Health Watch January 2007 issue
http://www.health.harvard.edu/newsweek/Why-its-hard-to-change-unhealthy-behavior.htm

(2) John, Peter and Smith, Graham and Stoker, Gerry (2009) Nudge nudge, think think: two strategies for changing civic behaviour. Political Quarterly, 80 (3). pp. 361-370. ISSN 0032-3179

(3) Séguin, Angèle Rancourt, Clémence The Theatre: An Effective Tool for Health Promotion http://whqlibdoc.who.int/whf/1996/vol17-no1/WHF_1996_17(1)_p64-74.pdf

SWOT Weakness–>Monthly Meetings

In the spring of 2012, our 2011-2012 AIF Fellow Margy Elliott conducted a SWOT (Strengths, Weaknesses, Opportunities, and Threats) analysis for Calcutta Kids. Margy carried out long interviews with representatives of all of our stakeholders including all of the staff; beneficiaries; donors; former interns; current interns and volunteers. The management team along with the board of trustees has carefully gone over this detailed document and is implementing changes so as to promote and further reinforce our strengths, fix the weaknesses, take advantage of the opportunities, and close the holes on the potential threats. Over the coming months, we will share ways in which we have used the SWOT analysis to strengthen and protect Calcutta Kids.

One of the discovered internal weaknesses was a lack of communication between the field staff and management. Many staff members commented on the need for regular communication and regular staff meetings. So we started such monthly meetings in July and we’ve been having such fun with them.

October 2012 Monthly Meeting. Staff sitting in front of “jack-o-lanterns” they made.

We follow a simple agenda for these meetings:

  1. Ice-Breaker
    1. At the end of the previous meeting, a staff member is nominated to prepare and conduct the ice-breaking session at the beginning of the next meeting.
  2. Introduction
    1. We start off each meeting with a case study from the field—usually in the form of a PowerPoint presentation with photographs and associated text. The case is often meant to inspire the staff; share a lesson learned; or show how a particular counseling technique worked or didn’t work. As our work is divided into three geographical areas, each area has a chance to present once every three months.
  3. Updates/Announcements
    1. Job openings
    2. Program changes
    3. Data Feedback–we discuss the quantitative accomplishments of the past month
    4. Welcoming of new staff members; bidding farewell to departing staff
    5. Status updates on ongoing projects
    6. General explanation of accomplishments over the last month
    7. General plan for the coming month(s)
  4. Questions & Answers
    1. This is an opportunity for anyone in the organization to ask questions and raise concerns which need to be dealt with as an organization.
  5. Birthday Celebration & Welcomes and Goodbyes
    1. At these meetings we celebrate all the employees who have birthdays that month.
    2. While eating snacks and cake, we toast our departing staff members and welcome our newcomers.
The meetings are events which both management and field-level staff look forward to. They are a time for recommitting to our cause and to celebrate the community that is Calcutta Kids.

Ice-breaking activity

At the October monthly meeting, Noah and Evangeline were in charge of the ice-breaker. The day before the meeting, we told every member of the team to come in to work the following day with a cooking knife (they dubiously obliged) and Halloween and pumpkin carving was introduced. The staff broke up into groups of 2 and made beautiful ‘jack-o-lanterns’. The following day, Area-In-Charge, Barnali took all the pumpkins and cooked them into a delicious pumpkin stew and the whole staff ate it for lunch along with home-made luchis. –Noah Levinson

Chandan and his carved pumpkin

Sumana and her carved pumpkin

AIF Fellow impressions 2012-13 (2 of 2)

On our first day working as fellows at Calcutta Kids, about a month back now, Sriya and I found ourselves rolling our pant-legs up and wading into dark, murky water. We were walking door-to-door with the community health workers in Fakir Bagan. The health workers, who form the foundation of CK’s mission, cajoled and persuaded, informed and explained, about the basic behaviors that were essential for their health and the health of the child in their womb. I realized then, as the gentle fans in the homes of the expecting mothers did a valiant effort to dry our monsoon rain-soaked clothes, that public health didn’t get more grassroots than this. Calcutta Kids worked, rain or shine, at the deepest and most essential roots of maternal and child health, in areas that are black holes in the larger Indian public health system.

Cleaning the drains in Fakir Bagan

Compared to the U.S., Calcutta is, of course, a risky place. One thing that I heard many times from family and friends was to take care of my health. But the truth is no matter how much riskier my life has gotten since I came to Calcutta from Ohio, daily life for an inhabitant of Fakir Bagan is laden with an immensely greater amount of risk. We can look to life expectancy (an admittedly crude indicator). Life expectancy at birth in the U.S. is 78.5 years, and in India it’s 67.1 years (CIA World Factbook 2012). These are averages though; estimates of life expectancy in slums across the globe, ones similar to Fakir Bagan have ranged from seven to fifteen years lower than non-slum urban areas. The risks begin at the very beginning of life and continue throughout, and are not far from what the average American would have faced a century ago.

A healthy CK child

In my view, all health providers at their core attempt to mitigate and prevent risk for their beneficiaries. At the most essential and highest impact stages of life, Calcutta Kids tackles this vast disparity for risk of death and illness. I’ve seen this done through a myriad of MCH programs, including nutrition for malnourished children, regular immunization, check-ups with an on-staff physician, and regular meetings with our health workers.

Immunizations about to be given

Over the next year, Calcutta Kids’s capacity to be involved and engaged within the community will increase, including the behavior change communication programs and community health meetings Sriya will be aiding with as well as the new child development corner. Additionally, Calcutta Kids will be transitioning the health clinic into the Ma o Shishu Shiksha Kendra community center, right in the thick of Fakir Bagan, and initiating a potential geographical expansion within the Howrah slums. I look forward to helping with these goals throughout the year and many more rain soaked home visits.–Pranav Reddy (AIF William J. Clinton Fellow 2012-2013)